About your Search

20121201
20121231
STATION
CSPAN2 5
CSPAN 4
FBC 2
CNNW 1
KGO (ABC) 1
KRON (MyNetworkTV) 1
SFGTV2 1
WBAL (NBC) 1
LANGUAGE
English 17
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17
in the kentucky wilderness on sunday, february 12, he entered a world as harsh and primitive as if he had been born a thousand years earlier. there was no doctor. simply giving birth put his mother's life in mortal danger. the only help available with the old granny women as they called her, who was summoned from miles away. a newborn baby was washed up in water and carried up a hill from a chirping spring, wrapped in animal fur and laid on a bed of dried up corn husks on a mud floor. now in later years, lincoln would allow his political supporters to glamorize his frontier roots. they made him out to be a sort of backless superman, but the log cabin had no romance for him. lincoln knew first-hand the dead-end life of an undeveloped economy. all the hardship and sorrow of what was called vintage living. his strongest boyhood memories were of death and near-death. the time he almost drowned as a boy. the time he was knocked cold by a kicking horse. his younger brother, his mother and his best friend in the world. this boy blessed with a naturally brilliant mind felt like an alien on a hostile p
wilderness. i really like that about this. you could maybe get a little snapshot of what they are expecting. >> it is an interactive, keck sculpture that is interacted with by the visitor. >> they are a lot about and they fall down the belt. it moves the belt up, and if you turn that faster, the butterflies fall in the move of words. >> the art reflect the commission's commitment to acquiring the best work from the bay area and beyond. in addition to the five new commissions, 20 artworks that were already in the airport collection were reinstalled. some of which were historically cited in the terminal. it includes major sculptures by the international artists. as a collection, these art works tell the story of the vibrant arts scene in the early 1960's through the mid-1980s's. the illustrate san francisco's cultural center and a place of innovation that is recognized and the love throughout the world. one of the highlights is a series of three left tapestries. they are on view after being in storage for 20 years. these tapestries representing various gardens. from his years of living in san
-related accident on highway 24 in iran the. east of wilder wrote on the shoulder of the highway when another car lost control and struck the side of the fire engine. the car rolled over and hit three firefighters including the driver into the first car. three veteran firefighters you see here were transported to john muir hospital in walnut creek. two of the firefighters need surgery. >> on to more headlines of the decision about whether the u.s. supreme court will take up the case of proposition 8 could come as early as this morning. we were hoping to get where friday did it not happen. they will post their decision this morning at 630. the court was scheduled to discuss the gay rights issue on friday. four justices must agree to hear the case before it can afford. if there is no decision the justices may discuss them at a future conference including one on december 7th. if they decide not to take on the issue we can wait to get word from the court as to whether there will hear the case. it struck down a marriage will resume in california. >> the national news announced the latest on the loomin
boyfriend in the snowy wilderness talks about her ordeal after these messages. one is for a clean, wedomestic energy future that puts us in control. our abundant natural gas is already saving us money, producing cleaner electricity, putting us to work here in america and supporting wind and solar. though all energy development comes with some risk, we're committed to safely and responsibly producing natural gas. it's not a dream. america's natural gas... putting us in control of our energy future, now. we're for the individual. the food lover. the movie lover. the road tripper. and the music mentor. ♪ we're for the gamer. the play maker. the page turner. and the up-all-nighters. so when we set out to make a smart phone we didn't make one for all of us. we made one for each of us. new windows phone. reinvented around you. we made one for each of us. to the best vacation sp(all) the gulf! it doesn't matter which of our great states folks visit. mississippi, alabama, louisiana or florida, they're gonna love it. shaul, your alabama hospitality is incredible. thanks, karen. love your
was in the wilderness. jimmy carter occupied the white house and the house and senate were safely democrat hands. with the election of president reagan in 1980, republicans took control of the white house and the senate. but in the house where newt gingrich went to work each day, he was badly outnumbered. i worked as a hill staffer for a congressman whose author was only steps away from newt's. i can history of our representatives like newt, the minority was often a lonely place. the republicans had held the majority there since 1954 and there was not a soul alive who could ever imagine the republican majority again. except for newt. there's no seniority, but a tireless work ethic, dedication and mind filled with ideas. it is newt gingrich or sat in the back benches of congress and methodically devised a strategy over several years to make the republican party party of ideas once again. in this newt who devised the famous contract with america. a plan that gave republicans more to run against in historic 1994 elections. he gives them something to run for. in this newt to rally the faithful behin
of order" and tlc's "breaking amish" have also focused on the wilder side of amish life. >> it a controversial concept, and reality feeds on controversy. it's outrageous. it's mysterious. it's unexpected. >> reporter: the network's website acknowledges most of the show is re-enactments, but according to levi, all the stories are the god's honest truth. linsey davis, abc news, new york. >> hope you caught that last word re-enactment. so you're not actually watching it. but they insist the stories are true. but you're not actually watching it unfold. >> it's reality, it's rob's reality with lebanon levi in your household, isn't it? >> that's what i'm talking about. now we're talking. >> who are you paying for a hit? who are you taking out? >> taking out willis, clearly. he's talking trash about the giants/saints game. >> i would just like an italian sausage, please. did you see the sign? i'm hungry. >>> when we -- when we come back, he's back in "the skinny." >> coming up on "world news now." ♪ >>> willis is back. can you tell? >>> willis is back. can you tell? here we g
plans to turn the land into a marine wilderness area, and as a result, the oyster company and 30 employees are out of work. kevin is the owner of drake's bay and now suing for an injunction to keep his business open. good morning to you, kevin. >> good morning, gretchen. how are you? >> gretchen: doing just fine. thank you for getting up so early. so tell me what you've been doing for all these years, your oyster farm. >> the oyster farm is really kind of a main stay in our community. we produce about a third of the oysters grown in the state of california. we get about 50,000 visitors a year who love this place, been here for over eight decades and the community and our county and san francisco bay area loves ush washington, d.c. >> gretchen: so the interior department wants to shut you down. why? >> well, actually a small handful of folks who are really wilderness activists who care deeply about getting people off the land, i think is the best we can tell, want to give up something to create a humanless landscape and it's a little strange because national sea shore was created
the country, so he began preaching about a sense of new national peril as a voice in the wilderness. most of his peers at the top of what became the leader party opposed his new militarism, especially israel's second prime minister. and he was a man who most americans had not heard of, and he believed passionately that israel's security could only be assured through a strategy of peaceful integration which required compromise and accommodation with the arabs. nasser, the egyptian military dictator who had taken over in 1952, carried on a secret correspondence with him facilitated by our central intelligence agency whose officers believed that israel and egypt could come to terms. yet at the time, the policies based on diplomacy, negotiation, integration was anathema to ben-gurion. where ben-gurion said we should get ready for war as a nation, his cabinet, however, said no. its members were listening to sharon who was listening to president eisenhower and to john foster dulles about a new world order of the u.n. charter, about the strategic importance of peace and of conflict resolution by
, his party, like the republican party today, was in the wilderness. the jimmy carter occupied the white house, and both the house and senate were safely in democratic hands. but with the election of president reagan in 1980, republicans took both the house and the senate. but in the house, where newt gingrich went to work each day, he was badly outnumbered. now, i worked as a hill staffer for a congressman's office who was only steps away from newt, and i can assure you for representatives like newt, the minority was often a lonely place. the republicans had not held the majority there since 1954, and it was not a soul alive who could ever imagine a republican majority again. oh, except for newt. with no seniority but a tireless work ethic, a vision and a mind filled with ideas, it was newt gingrich who sat in the back benches of congress and methodically devise a strategy over several years to make the republican party a party of ideas once again. it was newt edifies the famous contract with america. plan to give republicans more than something to run against the historic 1944 election
a pretty good rally. dagen: apple maps so that the people got stranded in the wilderness in australia. [ laughter ] connell: all right, charles. dagen: thank you very much. connell: there is no reason to jump on it. more from michigan. unions protesting this right to work legislation. we will take you there. dagen: more soldiers being booted from the military because they are just too big. take a look at world currency today. is it time to plan a trip yet. that would be a big no. ♪ >> 22 minutes past the hour. severe weather continue to pound parts of the bid west. the slow-moving storm dumped ten and a half inches in just 24 hours. the twin cities have seen almost as much snow already has all of last winter. a 31-year-old man is shot, execution style, while walking down the street yesterday. police are now looking for two suspects. medics rushed the victim to the hospital where he died. defense attorneys for. to asking a judge to and gps monitoring. those are your headlines. dagen: thank you. british banking giant agreeing to pay almost $2 billion. more than $1.9 billion. a record
. lots of directions ead people to be stranded in the wilderness . 40 miles from desired destinations. already a number of high-profile executives at apple have left. dagen: you can seriously get lost. it is dangerous. twitter and instagram have broken up. instagram pulled all of its images from twitter last night. they are no longer instantly visible. you can still see them, but you have to click on a direct link as opposed to automatically see the photo. the founder of instagram says they wanted to take photo previews off of twitter to drive traffic back to their own site. of course, instagram is owned by facebook. connell: you think it is annoying when 1% doesn't stop talking or just keeps getting up on the airline. talking through the safety demonstration. they do not like it when you do that. complaining about the lack of space in the overhead department. stuffing too much in the overhead compartment. oh, no, no, no. clicking people's fingers to get a flight attendant attentioo, which is annoying on or off the plane. dagen: that is obnoxious. i have caught myself doing that. hey,
. it added wilderness protection to over 2 million acres, it designates 1,100 miles of wild and scenic rivers, added more than 2,800 miles to the national trail system, and i was proud to be part of the effort to enact that legislation. finally, i'll make a few comments on the way that we in the congress conduct our own business. any fair assessment has to conclude that in this area we have lost ground in the last two decades. public opinion of the performance of congress is at an all-time low, and it is not hard to see why. i'll mention three obvious wears in which the functioning of congress has worsened. first is the willingness of some in congress to shut down the government. in 1995 we saw the leadership of the house of representatives demonstrate that they considered refusing to fund the government as an acceptable bargaining ploy in that efforts to prevail in disputes with president clinton and democrats on spending issues. since 1995, that think th threao withhold appropriations has been made several more times, and as we saw then, shuttlin shutting e government is harmful, wasteful t
's not afraid to be a voice in the wilderness. and all too often, we don't agree with dennis. but we always understood where his passion comes from. and it comes from his deep faith and the fact that he realy believes in america just as the rest of us do. but on a personal note, dennis has become a good friend of mine. we share a deep conviction about obesity in our nation and ways to conquer it. and who knows, maybe on the outside, we will work together to try to find solutions to that. to steve austria, who just stood at this podium. i got to know steve in the state legislature. while we didn't really work together on bill well, actually went to arizona to watch ohio state win its national championship and it was there that i realy got to know him and his wife on a personal level. it was there he shared with me his dream to one day serve in this congress. i'm so glad he was able to let that dream come true. to my good friend steve latourette. when you come as a special election you don't get this orientation that people get when they come as a class. you get elected and you're thrown on t
mag is something that is not needed. try taking a walk in the alaska wilderness and tell a grizzly bear that that the 44 is not needed. the three weapons were shown that this maniac had was a glock,ter , a high-end and a high-end sig sauer. anybody should have those under lock and key. and if they are in a state that has concealed carry, like here in oklahoma we have open carry, which i think is ridiculous. i am a correctional officer at and have been one for 20 years. i don't want a bad guy to know i have a weapon on me. i want to be able to protect the people that are in. whatever in like if i would've been there when gabrielle giffords was shot, it would not have been a little old lady to take the guy down. i would've been one of the first people sending sead his way -- lead his way. guest: thank you for calling. host: a tweet -- guest: i have no idea. if senator mcconnell comes on the show, maybe he will have an answer. host: does it help you as a congressman to have the republican leader from your state in the senate? guest: i don't think it is made any difference of our. ther
their destination into a desert wilderness. some folkings were stranded for a day without food or water. apple has told cnn its working very hard to fix its maps. i think that goes to show it never hurts to have the old handy dandy real physical map in your hand. >> somebody tells you, you make a left turn at this street. >> if you're trying to get into the city and you're amongst the brush, you may have taken a wrong turn somewhere. >>> you may not know her name but she was certainly one of the most influential hispanic women on both sides of the u.s./mexico border. up next, jenni rivera's rise from poverty to superstardom. it's lots of things. all waking up. ♪ becoming part of the global phenomenon we call the internet of everything. ♪ trees will talk to networks will talk to scientists about climate change. cars will talk to road sensors will talk to stoplights about traffic efficiency. the ambulance will talk to patient records will talk to doctors about saving lives. it's going to be amazing. and exciting. and maybe, most remarkably, not that far away. the next big thing? we're going to w
in the wilderness to work, we have been sent here to work and we need to get down to it. in the final hours of this congress and we have the threat of working christmas, if we have to do it to get things done, i'm willing to do that, but the majority should help solve the nation's most pressing issue, that's why we're here. do not actively choose to leave the work unfinished. as we silt and wait for gos on the fissclaldeliff, the other -- there is other legislation that's ready that could be done now, could help our markets, relieve the mind of employer, could give security to the middle class and people below that and we certainly ought to be doing it. today's rule simply does the following. all we're doing now at this minute is we're giving the majority the freedom to spend the rest of this month and the rest of this year on minor, noncontroversial legislation. i refuse to give this blank check to a majority that has yet to show any interest in completing the outstanding work. i urge my colleagues to join me in opposing today's rule so we can try to get back to d -- get back to work. toda
'm sure he feels like he's a voice in the wilderness by doing that, but every single week each of us gets this special appeal from emanuel cleaver to be what we should be, stewards much our country and to do it in a way that does not demean our institution and demean each other and to advocate for what we believe, but to do it in a way that is more human and kind. i want to join with my colleagues in thanking him for his leadership, but most of all i want to thank him for the tremendous role model he has been for our institution to try to make our institution a better place in which to serve and to try to make each of us better members of this institution. i yield back, mr. chairman. the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizes the gentleman from massachusetts, mr. neal, for five minutes. mr. neal: i ask unanimous consent to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. neal: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, let me also thank reverend cleaver at his request i can't -- series of social security and spent the better part of two days with him and i got op
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17